Stunning Birds in Ecuador | Outside My Window


Chestnut-breasted coronet, Ecuador, March 2019 (photo by Michelle Kienholz)

Friends of mine recently returned from a birding trip in the Ecuadoran Andes with Audubon Society of Western Pennsylvania. These photos from Michelle Kienholz have made me want to go there.

The hummingbirds are stunning in shape and color. Above, a chestnut-breasted coronet (Boissonneaua matthewsii) lives in the sub-tropical forest at 4,000 to 8,500 feet above sea level.

Below, the long-tailed sylph (Aglaiocercus kingii) is best viewed from behind to see his iridescent 4.7-inch tail. He lives in the forest at 3,000 to 9,800 feet.

Long-tailed sylph, Ecuador, March 2019 (photo by Michelle Kienholz)

Speaking of tails, this one is astounding on the black-tailed trainbearer (Lesbia victoriae). Despite his long equipment he maneuvers skillfully in gardens and bushy areas at 8,500 to 13,000 feet.

Black-tailed trainbearer, Ecuador, March 2019 (photo by Michelle Kienholz)

Michelle says it rained a lot in Ecuador but the birds didn’t mind. Here, a black flowerpiercer (Diglossa humeralis) contemplates his next move. The sharp tip on his beak is a tool for piercing flowers.

Black flowerpiercer, Ecuador, March 2019 (photo by Michelle Kienholz)

As colorful as a hummingbird, the masked trogon (Trogon personatus) is the size of an American robin. The trogon’s upright perching style makes him appear larger than that.

Masked trogon, Ecuador, March 2019 (photo by Michelle Kienholz)

Ecuador is on my Bucket List.

(photos by Michelle Kienholz)