Audubon.org Helps Provide Some Answers to the Hummingbird Mystery!

Hummingbird in flight
Hummingbirds, an avian family

From the excellent Audubon.org article focused on the hummingbird,…

Back in 1557, Jean de Léry published a journal of his travels to Brazil. In it was one of the first descriptions of hummingbirds to reach the Old World. Early European explorers like Léry had never seen anything like the fearless, tiny birds that buzzed around their heads when they reached the Americas. As a result, hummingbirds quickly joined the birds-of-paradise as must-haves for any natural history collection and Victorian drawing room. In 1851, the Crystal Palace in London exhibited more than 300 hummingbird specimens, dazzling crowds, along with Queen Victoria herself.

From Wikipedia.org:

Hummingbirds are birds native to the Americas that constitute the family Trochilidae. They are among the smallest of birds, most species measuring 7.5–13 cm (3–5 in) in length. Indeed, the smallest extant bird species is a hummingbird, the 5 cm (2.0 in) bee hummingbird weighing less than 2.0 g (0.07 oz).They are known as hummingbirds because of the humming sound created by their beating wings which flap at high frequencies audible to humans. They hover in mid-air at rapid wing-flapping rates, which vary from around 12 beats per second in the largest species, to in excess of 80 in some of the smallest. Of those species that have been measured in wind tunnels, their top speed exceeds 15 m/s (54 km/h; 34 mph) and some species can dive at speeds in excess of 22 m/s (79 km/h; 49 mph)

Hummingbirds are one of our favorite bird families to follow and admire their beauty!

Hummingbird feeding

Sources: Aububon.org article

…and from Wikipedia.org:

Photos: Creative Commons photos:

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